7 steps to drawing for trainers

Attention trainer colleagues! You are going to love these eLearning snippets from Ole Qvist-Sørensen, a graphic facilitator for visual language and owner of the Danish visual thinking company “Bigger Picture“.

In these videos Ole demonstrates how to draw just about anything you might need for illustrating concepts, ideas and processes in just seven simple steps: 1.) People, 2.) Places, 3.) Process, 4.) Speech, 5.)  Color, 6.) Effect and 7.) All other (icons).

You will need about 30 minutes to watch all 9 videos  in one sitting (including introduction and summary). Enjoy!

Introduction

Part 1: People

Part 2: Place

Part 3: Process

Part 4: Speech

Part 5: Color

Part 6: Effect

Part 7: All other (icons)

Part 1-7: Bringing it all together

Have a great weekend and CU you soon,

Shailia

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Breakdown at the playground

Little Jack didn’t need a push. Impetus. Dizzy on the up-rush, he ran in.

First see, first play. To the jungle gym. Up the middle grid, to the tip top. Hinged knee swings like open doors. Hair flying round. Smiles seem like frowns. World upside down.

To the wobbly thing. Horse on a spring. Looked like fun, but it’s boring. So what.

To the wide slide. Singed finger pads on the climb up. The sun has done its part to make the latter hot. Caution to the wind, down the metal tube. Burned backside. Not so bad, but maybe not again.

To the sand box and the cutesy pie. Pink hair ribbon and a yellow bucket. Baking dirt cakes for pretend friends. Not quite so sweet. Unkeen to share with a real mate. Whack shovel smack. Run, get out of here.

What a great day, on the playground!

…………………….

Jack standing, by the wayside. Same playground on another day. So many options, potential for mistakes. Better think it through to the end of play.

There’s the jungle gym. Could be fun. Upside-down. But then again. There’s the blood rush in the head. Could lose control or perspective. Why fall off, even bust a crown.

There’s the springy horse. Wobble to amuse. Or a humdrum mare with lackluster flair. Why waste time.

There’s the grand slide. Maybe glide down. Clearly the wrong size. Why get stuck, and be mortified.

There’s that fine girl, sitting right there.  Could cooperate. Maybe build a castle, with a moat and gate. Surely not her taste. Why make things awkward, completely lose face.

Life’s no playground.

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So, what happened to little Jack, his impulsiveness and his joy for life?

He grew up. And along the way he learned to adopt a behavior pattern that many of us are familiar with:

  • feeling an inner impulse only to suppress it in the next millisecond
  • seeing all the way to the imaginary bad ending we fear will come instead being short-sighted and focused on the joy of beginning something new
  • paralyzing ourselves with the idea that we once we start something we aren’t permitted to stop and drop it to do something else if it isn’t what we expected
  • over-thinking our time on this playground that is life instead of playing joyfully

I like to call it “breakdown at the playground.”

Little Jack’s five tips for more fun on the playground:

  1. Follow your impulse to play.
    RUN onto the playground. DO NOT STAND there looking at all the options  from the sidelines.
  2. Do something fun.
    START DOING the thing that attracts you most right now. DON’T THINK it to death. Just follow your strongest inner impulse and do it.
  3. See what happens.
    Let yourself BE SURPRISED. You may find it’s everything or nothing like you expected. You may love it or hate it. But one thing’s for sure: it’s FOR REAL and not just your speculation about how it might be.
  4. Continue or try something else.
    If you like it, great. CONTINUE doing it until the impulse driving you subsides. If you don’t like it, MOVE ON to the next thing that seems most appealing in the next moment.
  5. Repeat
    KEEP COMING BACK to the playground. GET BETTER at trusting your inner impulses each time you play and reap the rewards.

And no matter what, remember not to take yourself too seriously. Life can be your playground, if you let it 😉

Until we meet again,

Shailia

[Today’s blog post is dedicated to Martha, who loves this metaphor.]

Roman Braun on the art of business and communication

As you may know, Pat and I both look back on long careers in the areas of brand communication, digital marketing and advertising. Up to now, we have frequently written about topics related to personal development.

Starting today, we are broadening the spectrum to include matters related to business and business coaching – e.g.  leadership and organizational creativity (to name a few). In doing so, we would like to share our experience and expertise, as well as those of qualified and inspiring guest bloggers.

We are very pleased and honored that Roman Braun is kicking off with the first article in this domain. In this blog post you’ll hear what he has to say about the art of business and communication. In German. Enjoy!

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Was gute Unternehmensplanung mit Kunst zu tun hat

Ein Reporter stellt dem Hundertjährigen die unvermeidliche Frage:
“Worauf führen Sie Ihr langes Leben zurück?”
“Das kann ich noch nicht sagen”, meint der Greis, “ich verhandle noch mit zwei Frühstücksflockenfirmen und einem Fruchtsaftfabrikanten.”

Werbung ist ein fester Bestandteil unserer Kultur, weil

Erfolg = Leistung x Kommunikation²

Es ist zu wenig gut zu sein in dem, was Du machst, Du musst es die Menschheit auch wissen lassen.

Trotzdem ist in Krisenzeiten der erste Impuls, in der Werbung zu sparen. Henry Ford, der erste Held des Industriezeitalters, hatte eine klare Position zur Werbung:
Wer aufhört zu werben, um Geld zu sparen, kann ebenso seine Uhr anhalten, um Zeit zu sparen.

Also sehen wir uns die Ausgangssituation an

Die Ansprüche der Klienten sind klar:

Die Umsetzung soll zwar originell sein,
darf aber weder zu infantil sein

noch zu plump

Das erhöht auch den Stresslevel in der internen Kommunikation:

Aber wenn es gelingt, kann etwas großartiges daraus werden:

Gute Unternehmensplanung, plant Kunstwerke wie dieses!

Zur guten Unternehmensplanung nochmal

Henry Ford

Henry Ford

Wenn Sie einen Dollar in ihr Unternehmen stecken wollen,
so müssen Sie einen weiteren bereithalten,
um das bekannt zu machen.

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Roman BraunDer Autor:

Roman Braun, Bestseller-Autor, langjährige Erfahrung als Business- und Mental-Coach in Wirtschaft, Politik und Sport; Direktor von Trinergy International (“Europas Nr. 1 für akademisches Coaching und NLP”), leitet seit über zehn Jahren Coaching-Ausbildungen. Zu seinen Kunden zählen neben Organisationen wie IBM, Philips, Beiersdorf, Agip, Mobil, Opel und UNIDO auch Weltcupsieger und Weltmeister.

Weiterführende Links:

Is it true?

Oscar WildeYesterday on “work in progress”, I posted the following quote from Oscar Wilde:

“We are all standing in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.”

I did so as sort of an experiment. Because I was wondering if people would react to it as strongly as I did.

Here’s what I got: Nobody “Liked” the Facebook link and no-one downloaded the attached PDF as would be the usual thing to expect for any regular post. No approval, but also no aversion. I got no reaction really.

I saw the quote (written before 1900) for the first time very recently. Here is how I reacted. At first I thought: “Ah.” And then: “Huh?” And finally: “Is it true?” After thinking about it, I noticed that this short statement made me feel downright uncomfortable and I wasn’t sure why.

Then I realized. It is one of those tricky, subtle, pseudo-positive messages that we see and hear almost every day. In the paper, on TV, in conversations with co-workers and so on. The content varies and other words are used, but the modern gist is pretty much the same. In my mind, suggestions like these rang out:

This world is in a mess, but some of us (in the West) are lucky.

+++ or +++

Life is difficult, but let’s keep our heads up.

I had to ask myself these questions:

  • How much suffering are these types of seemingly harmless suggestions and our adoption of them causing?
  • How much depression and stress are related to this type of thinking?

Byron Katiee

In her process of inquiry called “The Work“, Byron Katie recommends we question our own thinking and ask ourselves four basic questions. She concludes the process with a so-called “turnaround“.

On her homepage “The Work” (http://www.thework.com) she elaborates:

  1. “Is it true?
  2. Can you absolutely know that it is true?
  3. How do you react, what happens, when you believe that thought?
  4. Who would you be without the thought?
  5. Turn it around (the concept you are questioning), and don’t forget to find genuine, specific examples of each turnaround. Each turnaround is an opportunity to experience the opposite of your original statement…”

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Let’s turn around Byron Katie’s process – because I find it fun and inspiring to use it in both directions…

First the turnarounds:

“We are all standing in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars” can be turned around to:

  • We are all standing in the stars, but many of us choose to look into the gutter.
  • Some of us are standing in the gutter, but we are all stars among men.

“This world is in a mess,but some of us (in the West) are lucky” turns around to:

  • The world is as it should be, but some of us are unlucky not to see it.
  • Luckily, the world is always perfectly arranged.

“Life is difficult, but let’s keep our heads up” can be turned around to:

  • Life is easy, but we keep putting our heads down.
  • It’s hard to keep our heads up when we make life so difficult.

or maybe just simply…

LIFE IS BEAUTIFUL

And now ask yourself the following questions:

  1. “Is it true? [that life is beautiful]
  2. Can you absolutely know that it is true? [write a list of evidence if you have to]
  3. How do you react, what happens, when you believe that thought?
  4. Who would you be with the thought?

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Now I am going to modify yesterday’s post. It practically gave me a bodily allergic reaction to post it – ha, ha. I hope I receive a reaction from some of you this time, if only in your own minds.

Until we meet again,

Shailia

P.S. Add a “turnaround” of your own in the comment field below, if you think of one.

Standing in the gutter

IS IT TRUE?

“We are all standing in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.”

Standing in the Gutter

Illustration published with permission of Daniel Jennewein: http://www.danielsdailydrawings.blogspot.com/

Quote by: Oscar Fingal O’ Flahertie Wills Wilde

Oscar Wilde

Now accepting help

Lately, it’s been pretty calm on the blog front here at “work in progress”. We’ve been busy with other things.

Pat BoldPat is half-way through the third trimester of pregnancy number two. With just six weeks to go, she is on the record as “nesting”: onesies and baby booties being at the top of her personal agenda. She is also busy “transforming” within the framework of her contextual coaching education.

I, on the other hand, am knee-deep in all that is my master thesis. Typically, I am “in control” and “on top” of these matters. Always prepared, ever organized, invariably ahead. But these days, in terms of my thesis, my state can only be described as flat-footed, pell-mell and twice-overdue.

In theory, I know how to get out of this state. Having a formal coaching education, there are a multitude of tools and methods at my disposal to use and abuse at will – from belief change and anchor processes to positive inner dialogs and resource trances (just to name a few).

But alas, I remain in “stuck-state” and all attempts at self-coaching myself into a pleasant and productive frame-of-mind seem to fail.

In reference to this phenomena (which happens more often than we would like to admit), Pat and I have established a term which we jokingly use: uncoached. We say things like: “I know this shouldn’t bother me, but I am so uncoached right now and just don’t care.”

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When I am feeling wedged-in, overwhelmed and otherwise uncoached, I remind myself of these HUMAN TRUTHS:

  • Sometimes we are big and sometimes we are small.
  • Despite all our knowledge and good intentions, we will not always do what we know or intend.
  • It is pertinent to individual survival and just plain smart to accept help at the right times.

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NOW ACCEPTING HELP!

Accepting Help

Illustration published with permission of Daniel Jennewein: http://www.danielsdailydrawings.blogspot.com/

And so, instead of beating myself up, I decided to acknowledge that I’m feeling small, forget what I think I know and simply ask for a help. Here’s what I got in return:

  • Daniela sat with me at her house in Vienna for three hours and shared all the things she had learned while writing her own thesis last year. Afterwards, she sent further guidelines and useful information via e-mail.
  • Petra expertly intervened with a simple but direct Facebook message that almost immediately helped me to move from “I hate doing this” to “I’m in control and can make this a great experience”. She also asked some important questions that I hadn’t asked myself and offered to skype to discuss possible completion strategies.
  • Niclas brought me some books on statistical analysis and made time for an idea sparring-match on Friday.
  • My husband Heiko read my dissertation abstract and then helped me find more relevant research which led me to somewhat of a breakthrough.

Am I now loving this master thesis with every molecule in my being?

No. Or should I say, not yet. But I am feeling much better than last week. No longer in stuck-state, I am moving forward. Baby booty steps, grant it. But moving forward none-the-less.

Until we meet again,

Shailia

[Todays blog post is dedicated to all of my fellow graduate students who are working on their thesis along with me. I love you guys!]

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Motivators and reminders (to download): Accepting Help

The upside of cost

(as seen on Roman Brauns Trinergy-NLP-Blog on October 22, 2009)

Yesterday, I met with an illustrator about some ideas for a logo. I was feeling inspired and a little creative, so it seemed natural that I ended up buying art. It went down like this.

I had just left his office and no sooner had I turned the first corner onto a side street that I heard the rhythm and the calls:

Boom, boom, boom. “Pictures for sale!” Boom, boom, boom. “Ten cents a piece!” Boom, boom, boom. “Pictures for sale!” Boom, boom, boom. “Ten cents a piece!” Boom, boom, boom…

Picture of a houseThen I saw them: a painted-faced, munchkin-bunch of 4 and 5 yr. olds in front of a city kindergarten. Someone had seen fit to let them out onto the sidewalk wearing impromptu costumes resembling Native American dress. They had feathers and a red-headed chief, whose name I later learned was Lucy.

She expertly calmed the natives as I surveyed the concrete vernissage. Lucy:Stop drumming! We have a customer!” After thinking it over carefully, I picked two works of art with the point of a finger (for 20 cents I thought I could afford to indulge). Lucy:I said stop drumming!” She lifted the rocks which were weighing down the pictures, handed them to me and held out her hand.

Picture of a jetI gave her one Euro (which didn’t impress her one way or the other) and walked away smiling as the drumming and the chanting began again. And as I looked back I was thinking: “That Lucy is a mini- entrepreneur.” And I wondered: “Did someone already teach her about the upside of cost?

Which made me think of Chris Anderson: In his book “Free – The Future of a Radical Price”, Anderson explains the why’s, the how’s and the advantages of the new free economy, in which we enjoy an abundance of things at no cost – like free software, masses of information (e.g. blog articles) and unlimited e-mail storage.

But Anderson is also careful to depict the downside of Free, which he dubs “the cost of zero cost”. He cites the findings of behavioral economists who set out to discover what happens psychologically when we get something for nothing. In one example, researchers set up a booth on a college campus and sold chocolate to students:

“They priced the Lindt truffles at 15 cents and the (Hershey) Kisses at 1 cent. The customers behaved pretty rationally, calculating that the difference in the quality of the two chocolates more than made up for their difference in price: 73 percent chose the truffle and 27 percent chose the Kiss.

Then Ariely (the research initiator) introduced Free into the equation, lowering the price of both chocolates by 1 cent. Now the Lindt truffle was 14 cents and the Kiss was free. Suddenly the Kiss became a hit. 69 percent chose it over the truffle. Nothing about the price/quality calculation had changed – the two chocolates were still priced 14 cents apart.”

FreeThese test subjects literally reversed their behavior due to the Free factor. Anderson provides further arguments that Free is in fact a powerful trigger for the human psyche; that we are subconsciously driven to and by Free. He goes on to talk about the excessive consumption of free snacks at a scientific conference, where he was amazed to see the well-educated participants leaving half-eaten bags of “gratis goodies” everywhere:

No cost, no commitment. People often don’t care as much about things they don’t pay for, and as a result they don’t think as much about how they consume them. Free can encourage gluttony, hoarding, thoughtless consumption, waste, guilt and greed. We take stuff because it’s there, not necessarily because we want it.”

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In my own self-development process and in my work as a coach, I have experienced this…

The price of change and personal development can be very minimal – like when we recognize an obstructive belief about ourselves and decide to exchange it for a constructive one. This can happen in a matter of seconds and no hard work follows. We just feel better and are somehow transformed.

Other times, the cost is higher and there is more at stake. And we may find ourselves needing to exhibit tenacity over a long period of time in order to reach a personal objective.

If you are in the process of consciously evolving and find yourself paying a price – however large or small – remember the upside of cost as you go your course:

  • Where there is cost, there is decision.
    This usually means you are driving instead of being driven (e.g. by Free). Good thing!
  • Where there is cost, there is commitment.
    And commitment leads to a far greater probability of success.
  • Where there is cost, we see value.
    In the end, you are likely to find yourself caring more about the changes you paid for than the ones that came for free.

Lucy could have given those pictures away. But somehow she knew about the upside of cost and the downside of free – without reading Anderson.

How competent!

Boom, boom, boom. “Pictures for sale!” Boom, boom, boom. “Ten cents a piece!” Boom, boom, boom. “Pictures for sale!” Boom, boom, boom. “Ten cents a piece!” Boom, boom, boom…

Until we meet again,

Shailia